D0884: Wayne Shaddock Ontario Black Duck Decoy

Excellent solid-bodied, glass-eyed black duck with a slightly turned head by Wayne Shaddock (1942-2001), Belleville and Trenton, Ontario, circa 1960s. The decoy is in near mint original paint other than a narrow stripe of touch up (sealer or varnish?) to two thin age cracks on the left side of the decoy. It has carved primaries, a fluted tail and carved side pockets and is marked on the bottom with Wayne's early "W" brand made with a heated piece of wire. The head is especially well detailed with carved mandibles, nostrils and nail and a unique and attractive feather paint. The decoy measures 15" in length, 4-1/2' in width and stands 5-1/2' tall at the head. Shaddock began carving as a teenager, making working and decorative decoys over a combined span of 35 years. He was proud of having birds in Buckingham Palace and in the collection of King Hussain of Jordan.

Price: $725.00

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D0840: Early Maine Red-Breasted Merganser Decoy

Superb red-breasted merganser decoy by an unknown Maine carver, circa 1st quarter, 20th century. A very folky long-necked carving with original steel bill and three-piece laminated body. The stylized original polychrome paint remains bold with light to moderate wear. It measures 19" in length from the tip of the bill to the tip of the tail but only 3 1/2" in width. It stands 9" high at the crest, but the body is only 2 1/2" deep. The neck and head are 3/4" thick with the base of the neck mortised into the first layer of the body. The decoy is "blind", without glass, paint or tack eyes.

Price: $2475.00

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D0836: Thousand Islands Black Duck Decoy, Circa 1960s

Very fine magnum solid-bodied black duck from New York's Thousand Islands region. In near-mint condition with intricately detailed feather paint, this monster measures 20" in length, 8" in width and stands 7.5" tall at the head, not including the keel. There is a tight crack in the neck, held securely in place by the dowel used to secure the head to the body. Although the maker of this decoy is presently unknown, it shares some characteristics with those of Woodville's Ken Harris. The initials "MR", which were marked into the bottom before the decoy was painted using the threaded post of a screw to impress the letters into the wood, could offer a clue as to the maker. Don E. Wolfe (1912-1990), Cape Vincent, NY, has also been suggested as a possible maker. Born in Rochester, NY, his carving career began in 1947 when he moved to Cedar Point State Park outside Cape Vincent where he worked with the park commission in maintenance and construction. Working during the slow winter periods, Wolfe carved about two dozen decoys each year through the 1960s.

Price: $350.00

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D0138: Reg Culver Broadbill Drake Decoy, 1st Q, 20th C

Outstanding broadbill drake by Reg Culver of Stratford, CT, circa mid-1st quarter, 20th century. The decoy is hollow-carved with glass eyes, original paint with a fine patina and exceptional combed paint on the back. It has a few small dings and scrapes, but is overall a fine decoy. When Ben Holmes died in 1912, Culver, who was working for Roz Bliss at the time, purchased 70 unfinished broadbill bodies from Holmes' widow. This was one of that group. Culver completed the construction of those decoys with heads of his own design. The use of the Holmes bodies led to confusion and false attribution of many Culver broadbills to Holmes, including this one. It is inscribed on the bottom, "This is a Ben Holmes decoy, 9/17/1966, Tom Marshall". Although Marshall was considered by many to be "the" expert on Connecticut decoys, this is a Culver. It is pictured and properly identified on page 94, Connecticut Decoys by Henry Chitwood. Culver's heads differ from Holmes' in that they are flat on top with low, bulging cheeks and thinner necks. Subsequent bodies made by Culver were blockier and less graceful than those started by Holmes. Many collectors consider Reg Culver's broadbills to be Stratford's finest.

Price: $3950.00

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D0266: Paul Lipke Blue-Winged Teal Drake Decoy

Rare hollow blue winged teal drake decoy, circa 1940s, in excellent original condition with only a few small scrapes and dings, by Paul Lipke of Whiting, Indiana, at the southern tip of Lake Michigan. This glass-eyed decoy, with head turned slightly to the left, measures 12" in length, 5" in width and stands 6" high at the head. It is pictured on page 180, Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations, Kangas, and on page 117, Bird Decoys and Duck Calls, Luckey and Lewis. Who made the decoy is known. What isn’t known is who Paul Lipke was. In April of 1985, depending upon which source you hear it from, a picker showed up at the Midwest Decoy Collectors Association show in St. Charles, Illinois, with between two dozen and four dozen decoys by this maker. All the picker knew was the carver’s name and hometown. The decoys were hollow-carved and flat-bottomed with weights bearing the initials “P.L.”. They had varying head styles with a fat, cheeky appearance and exhibited a strong Mason Factory influence, particularly in the paint patterns. They were estimated to have been made between 1940 and 1950. A buying frenzy ensued and when the dust cleared, the decoys were scattered from Illinois to New England. Little has been learned of Lipke since, and some collectors even question his existence. What is without question, however, is the fine quality of these decoys. Lipke is believed to have made only one rig of decoys, consisting of roughly 50 bluebills, blue-winged teal, redheads, canvasbacks and mallards. Further information on Lipke can be found in Decoy Magazine, Summer 1985, pgs. 32-33 and in The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, Enger, pgs. 224-227.

Price: $3950.00

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D0741: Harry Pember Calling Black Duck Decoy

Outstanding calling black duck decoy by Harry Pember of Milford, Connecticut, circa 3rd quarter of the 20th century. Harry hunted with old friends, including Tom Marshall, the Disbrow brothers and Keith Mueller, using decoys he carved for his own use, including this fine working bird. Made from 3 layers of dense cork with an inset wooden tail, the decoy remains in excellent original condition with only a couple of very small nicks to the paint. It has very extremely detailed bill and mouth carving, glass eyes and scratch-feather paint on the head, which is turned about 10 degrees to the left. The bird measures roughly 20" in length, 8" in height, including the keel, and is 8" wide.

Price: $525.00

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D0725: Harry Pember Black Duck Decoy With Mussel in Bill

Outstanding black duck decoy with a mussel clasped in its bill by Harry Pember of Milford, Connecticut, circa early 3rd quarter of the 20th century. Harry hunted with old friends, including Tom Marshall, the Disbrow brothers and Keith Mueller, using decoys he carved for his own use, including this fine working bird. Made from 3 layers of dense cork with an inset wooden tail, the decoy remains in near-mint condition. In addition to the mussel, it has very detailed bill and mouth carving, glass eyes and scratch-feather paint on the head, which is turned about 20 degrees to the right. The bird measures roughly 17" in length, 9" in height, including the keel, and is 8" wide.

Price: $595.00

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D0212: Warren Dettman Mallard Drake Decoy

Hollow-carved mallard drake decoy with raised split wingtips, detailed bill carving, an applied bottom board, glass eyes and near-mint original paint. It measures 16" in length, 7" in width and is almost 8" high at the head. The decoy is attributed to Warren Dettman of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, circa 1935, by most auction catalogs, but that attribution is questioned by some. "Whistling Wings, Whittled Ducks and Wetlands", a publication of the Milwaukee Public Museum (MPM), states, "Judging from an apparently early pair of mallards still in the family, Dettman first tried making bodies by hollowing a large block of wood from underneath, then covering the opening with a board. Perhaps dissatisfied with the technique, or unable to get large blocks of wood, Dettman turned to producing bodies from laminated pine boards, cutting out the centers of the middle ones before gluing all together", as detailed in the publication referenced above. This decoy is constructed in the earlier style. It is definitely from the Milwaukee Public Museum (MPM) "school". Dettman was a taxidermist at MPM and taught others, particularly WPA workers hired by the museum, to carve decoys. There is a possibility that these decoys were carved by one of those students. Deltacraft Plan No. 4642, Duck Decoys, shows a plan to make this decoy, including a photo of a near identical example on its cover. Deltacraft was part of Delta Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee. The plan shows that it was drawn by "E.H." and designed by Ed Hamilton. No Milwaukee collector I've spoken to seems to know the name. Whoever developed the design in that plan, not a later carver using the plan, made this decoy. See Items M053 and D0720 in the “Sold" section of this website for a Deltacraft pattern that was developed from these decoys as well as mallard hen by the same carver. This drake and the Deltacraft plan are pictured on page 137 of "Collecting Antique Bird Decoys and Duck Calls" by Luckey and Lewis.

Price: $3250.00

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