D0916: Early New Jersey Robin Snipe Decoy, Circa Late 1800s

Very appealing New Jersey robin snipe decoy with painted eyes by an unknown carver from the Tuckerton area, circa late 1800s. Lloyd Parker from Parkertown area has been suggested as the possible maker. Painted in the species' winter plumage this small (8 1/2" bill tip to tail tip and 2" wide) full-bodied shorebird is in original feather paint and retains its original bill and is in excellent overall structural condition with the exception of a small chip at the tip of the tail.

Price: $1850.00

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D0915: Leonard Doren Mallard Hen Decoy, Circa 1930s

Excellent hollow, round-bodied mallard hen decoy with glass eyes and detailed bill carving by Leonard Doren (1895-1965) of Pekin, Illinois, circa 1930. Best known for his owl decoys, Doren also produced over 200 practical and realistic mallards, pintails and bluebills over a career spanning 30 years. This decoy, carved in the classic Illinois River style, measures 16 1/2" in length from the tip of the bill to the tip of tail. It is in lightly-crazed original detailed feather paint. Exhibiting a pleasing patina, the decoy is in excellent structural condition showing only light to moderate wear. SOLD

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D0907: Harry V. Shourds Robin Snipe Decoy

Excellent robin snipe with painted eyes by Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa late 19th to early 20th century. Measuring 9" in length and about 2 1/4" in thickness, this full-bodied little bird in breeding plumage is in original paint showing only light flaking and wear. The original bill has had a professional repair by Russ Allen to replace a sliver off the bottom of the bill (see last two photos for "before" and "after" photos) with touch up to that area. There is an owner's mark, a stylized "A", etched into the paint below the stick hole. SOLD

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D0909: Rare Flying English Wood Pigeon Decoy, Circa Mid-20th Century

Rare and excellent flying wood pigeon, carved as if landing, by an unknown English maker, circa mid-20th century. Wood pigeon decoys in a flying form are seldom found. Most unusually, the body, including the head and bill, is carved from one piece of hardwood. The separately-carved wings are approximately 1/4" thick. They are slightly cupped and tapered at the tips and edges and are inset into the back of the decoy. The carving is in fine original condition with detailed feather paint on the back and wings, showing minimal wear other than a chip to the edge of the right wing tip. The bird measures 13" in length and has a wingspan of 21-1/2". The last photo shows this decoy along with a feeding example by the same maker (D0910l not included, available separately). This decoy was found in central England, near Sheffield. Stand included. SOLD

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M369: Joe Ahearn Bobwhite Quail Diorama, Circa 1940s

Fine diorama of a pair of flying bobwhite quail (male above, female below), by James Joseph "Joe" Ahearn (1904-1963), Stamford, CT and New York City, circa 1940s. An excellent effort, these roughly half-scale full-bodied quail measure 4 1/2" in length (tip of bill to tip of tail) with 6" wingspans. The diorama is in excellent structural condition with a few scratches and overall light wear to the Arts and Crafts style frame which is 10 1/8" x 12 3/8" x 3". The quail themselves are in mint condition with tiny glass taxidermy eyes, carved primaries and excellent detailed feather paint. Ahearn became well-known in the mid-1940's as a carver of miniatures. It is unclear when he began carving them although it is presumed that he started in the late 1930's, if not sooner. While Joe lived in the New York City area where he was a salesman for the National Cash Register Company he was known to have carved miniatures while on the road. At the onset of World War II, he and his wife moved to Stamford, Connecticut. The first documentation of his carvings being offered for sale is in the 1945-46 catalog of the Sporting Gallery and Bookstore in New York City. This catalog featured a wide selection of Ahearn's "functional hunter" and "sportsman oriented" items such as lamps, wall thermometers, letter openers, coat racks, tie racks, pipe racks, book ends and ashtrays in a variety of configurations. It was around this time that he also began offering his miniature carvings of waterfowl and upland game birds. One of the first and certainly the most important retailer to carry his carvings was the Crossroads of Sport store in New York City. They were enjoying a huge demand for A. J. King's miniatures and were more than eager to complement his products with another carver's work. Ahearn is featured in "Birds in Wood and Paint" by Joe Ellis. SOLD

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D0905: Mason Factory Blue-Winged Teal Decoy, Circa 1910

Nice Standard Grade glass-eyed blue-winged teal drake by the Mason Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910. The decoy is in original paint showing moderate flaking and wear. There is a hairline age split in the back and a wider one with factory-applied filler in the bottom. The neck filler has been professionally replaced with touch-up to that area (See last two photos). SOLD

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D0906: New Jersey Black-Bellied Plover Decoy, Circa 1900

Black-bellied plover by an unknown New Jersey maker, circa 1900. The decoy is a nice full-bodied bird in dry original paint showing average in-use wear with some light flaking. It measures 11’ in length from the tip of the bill to the tail. There is a thin crack in the neck, but it is quite stable. As seen in the last three photos, there is a chip on the right side of the head where the face meets the bill, but the bill itself is original and undamaged. Stand included. SOLD

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M367: Early Black Duck Wall Plaque, Bebe MacDonald, Quebec

Excellent folk art wall plaque featuring a half-bodied black duck decoy by Alain de Lotbiniere (Bebe) MacDonald (1886-1961), circa 2nd quarter, 20th century. MacDonald was from Rigaud in southwestern Quebec, near Montreal. He is recognized as an important Quebec artist and carver, not only for the quantity and quality of his work, but also for his influence on other craftsmen. After serving in the Canadian army during WWI, Bebe worked for Robin Last Shoe Factory before opening studios in Rigaud and Montreal. He made fine and highly sought-after decoys as well as his folk art wall plaques and was known for his meticulous decoy heads and precision in painting, both of which characteristics are on display in this plaque. Set on a textured background with marsh grass, the piece, done in MacDonald's most desirable style, is in excellent original paint. The glass-eyed black duck has a scratch-painted head with highly detailed bill carving, a raised wing with carved primaries and a fluted tail. It projects out from the background 1 1/4". Although darkened by age, the elaborate feather paint on the body is still visible. The carving is set in a lightly worn frame measuring 7 3/4" x 6 1/2" with the duck itself being approximately 6 1/4" in length and 3 1/2" in height. Formerly in ther collection of Samuel H. "Sam" Dyke, it is inscribed on the back, "For my son, Samuel H. Dyke. This was the property of Mr. Dwight L. Armstrong who died 9/10/1944. Given to me 10/20/1980. S. E. Dyke". Sam Dyke was one of the founding fathers of the Ward Museum and was a former Chairman of the Museum's Board of Directors. SOLD.

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