M370: Wildfowler-Style Redhead Drake Decoy, Richard & Marion Harris

Three-quarter scale Wildfowler-style decorative redhead drake by Richard and Marion Harris, Harris Wild Duck Decoys, Old Saybrook, Connecticut, circa 1960. The Harris's worked for Wildfower for 25 years, he as a carver and she as a painter, until the company moved to Quogue, Long Island, in the winter of 1957-1958. The solid-bodied carving, made of high grade Eastern white pine, is in excellent original paint other than for touchup at a tight and stable crack through the neck. One of the glass eyes is cracked but otherwise intact. The bird measures 11" in length, 4 3/4" in width and stands 5" tall at the head. As was characteristic of their work, black paint was used to indicate the separation of the bill and face. As was less common but seen in a few of their carvings, the margin between the face and bill was also wood-burned. A similar example can be seen on page 161 of Wildfowler Decoys by Dick Cowan and Dick LaFountain.

Price: $195.00

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M370: Three-Quarter Scale Redhead Drake, Richard & Marion Harris

Three-quarter scale Wildfowler-style decorative redhead drake by Richard and Marion Harris, Harris Wild Duck Decoys, Old Saybrook, Connecticut, circa 1960. The Harris's worked for Wildfower for 25 years, he as a carver and she as a painter, until the company moved to Quogue, Long Island, in the winter of 1957-1958. The solid-bodied carving, made of high grade Eastern white pine, is in excellent original paint other than for touchup at a tight and stable crack through the neck. One of the glass eyes is cracked but otherwise intact. The bird measures 11" in length, 4 3/4" in width and stands 5" tall at the head. As was characteristic of their work, black paint was used to indicate the separation of the bill and face. As was less common but seen in a few of their carvings, the margin between the face and bill was also wood-burned. A similar example can be seen on page 161 of Wildfowler Decoys by Dick Cowan and Dick LaFountain.

Price: $195.00

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D0920: Gene Hendrickson Old Squaw Decoy, Circa Mid-20C

Very nice hollow-bodied old squaw drake with tack eyes by Joseph Eugene "Gene" Hendrickson (1896-1971), Northfield, New Jersey, circa mid-twentieth century. The decoy, which has never been rigged, is in dry original paint showing only very light soiling. There is a very slight separation to the body seam with some paint loss in that area. Hendrickson used an insetted bottom weight in the same manner as Harry V. Shourds. His initials, JEH, are stamped into the weight. In addition to being a professional decoy maker, Hendrickson, who began carving decoys circa 1920, was also an accomplished sneakbox builder and carpenter. SOLD

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D0077: Bluebill Drake Decoy, Ontario or Michigan, Circa 3Q, 20C

Very nice bluebill drake from southwestern Ontario or Michigan , circa 3rd quarter, 20th century. Other than for a tight age split in the bottom, it is in near-mint original condition. Showing the influence of Ben Schmidt and Ken Anger among others from this area, this glass-eyed decoy exhibits heavy overall texturing and rasping, incised wing outlines, deeply carved side pockets, a fluted tail and detailed bill carving. The decoy measures 13.5" in length, 7" in width and stands 3" and 5.5" high at the back and head, respectively. The encircled initials "DS", presumably those of the maker, are stamped into the bottom. SOLD

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D0076: Sleeping Bluebill Hen Decoy, Ontario or Michigan, Circa 3Q, 20C

Well executed sleeping bluebill hen from southwestern Ontario or Michigan , circa 3rd quarter, 20th century. It is in near-mint original condition. Showing the influence of Ben Schmidt and Ken Anger among others from this area, this plump-bodied hen with glass eyes exhibits heavy overall rasping, incised wing outlines, deeply carved side pockets and a fluted tail. The decoy measures 13.5" in length, 7.5" in width and stands 4" and 6" high at the back and head, respectively. The encircled initials "DS", presumably those of the maker, are stamped into the bottom. SOLD

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D0923: Early Feeding Scottish Wood Pigeon Decoy

Very sculpturesque tucked-head feeding wood pigeon decoy with painted eyes by an unknown carver, circa early 1900s. This decoy, along with a rigmate, was found outside of Perth, Scotland, where it was hunted along the River Tay. There is a professional repair to the left wing tip, stretching diagonally across the last two inches of the wing with touch up to that area. Otherwise, the decoy is in well patinated original paint and retains its original bill. There are several age splits in the head and upper back, one of which was strengthened by the addition of two small nails, presumably when the decoy was made. The decoy is unusually large with a length of almost 16" and has a hollow recess drilled and chiseled into its belly, probably to reduce its weight. While most wood pigeon decoys were made in England itself, pigeons were and are hunted in Scotland as well, and it is very possible that this decoy and its mate were made by a heretofore unknown but very talented Scottish carver.

Price: $965.00

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D0912: Phil Jones Canada Goose Decoy, Circa 1950s

Very nice lesser Canada or cackling goose decoy by Phil Jones of Bellingham, Washington. In original condition, the decoy is hollow and appears to be constructed from some kind of fabric applied over a wooden framework and then coated with fiberglass. Think of a George Boyd canvas-covered Canada goose encapsulated in a protective coating of fiberglass. Jones worked for Inflite Boat Works, a company founded in Bellingham in 1957, that originally made small fiberglass boats. Apparently, Jones made this decoy in the late 50s to early 60s using the construction skills learned at the boat works. A small decoy, it only measures about 20” in length, 7.5” in width and stands about 8” high at the head. There is a wooden bottom board concealed under the fiberglass and fabric coating. A wooden head is covered in the same manner. As for the body, I can’t tell whether it was molded over a removable and reusable form or over a skeletal framework that remains in place. From their weight (only about 1 lb, 12 oz each), I’m thinking molded. As for the “paint”, I believe it is very possible that the fiberglass itself was colorized and “painted” on, although the detailed feather paint may have been applied before the fiberglass was applied. It is also possible that both techniques were used to achieve the original finish. The raised and crossed wingtips have a bit of flex to them and appear to have been made using very thin wooden lathe as a base. A very durable and serviceable decoy!

Price: $325.00

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M371: Early Decorative Common Snipe Carving

Well-accomplished decorative glass-eyed carving of a common (Wilson's) snipe in a marsh setting by an unknown maker, circa 3rd quarter, 20th century. Measuring 10" from the tip of the bill to the tip of the tail, the full-sized carving is in original paint with overall detailed feather and bill carving and a fluted tail. The wing primaries are separately carved and inset into the body. This is an early example of the realistic style of bird carving with most, if not all, of the carving done by hand rather than by small power tools. Other than a small area of flaking on the left wing coverts and some cracking in the gesso of the thighs, the carving is in near-mint condition. It is set on a mahogany base with a stump and marsh grass simulated by thin copper blades. There is a small paper sticker on the bottom with 4/23/96 printed on it; possibly a purchase date from the MDCA show at Pheasant Run that year.

Price: $425.00

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